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Tag: Drafts

Putting the recipient last… With Let.ter

Putting the recipient last… With Let.ter

Email is one of the most important ways people communicate in the contemporary world, yet it is one that is often frought with problems, most of which seem to stem from a lack of attention to detail before hitting the send button.

Over at MacDrifter, Gabe Weatherhead discusses a simple concept:

The last thing you write is the recipient address

Gabe discusses writing using non-email apps like Drafts on iOS and nvAlt on OSX.

I also use Drafts to prepare up new emails on iOS (both iPhone and iPad), but have found what I think is an ideal for preparing new emails on the Mac – the wonderful Let.ter app.

Let.ter starts with a simple blank screen, with four easy steps.

  1. Enter a subject
  2. Write the body in plain text / Markdown
  3. Enter the recipient(s) email address(es)
  4. Preview and then send

In both Let.ter and Drafts I extensively use TextExpander so they are both powerful yet simple apps for sending email.

I think that the utility behind Let.ter is that it is truly minimalist, and that it allows the use of Markdown. But since reading Gabe’s post, I am also thinking that leaving the recipient address until last before previewing is part of what makes the app useful.

Put your Mac to sleep from afar…

Put your Mac to sleep from afar…

As a trainer and presenter, I often set my Macbook Air up in classrooms and conference venues. When I go to lunch or another break, I often wonder whether I remembered to lock my Macbook Air.

This post today from MacSparky (@MacSparky on App.net and Twitter) provides a wonderful little automation that uses Drafts on iOS, Dropbox and Hazel on the Macbook Air.

So I can now be sitting at lunch, and type a command into Drafts, and as long as my Macbook is online, it will go to sleep a few seconds later.

A great automation tip from MacSparky!

Use Alfred 2 to mimic Drafts cool Append to Dropbox function

Use Alfred 2 to mimic Drafts cool Append to Dropbox function

Greg Pierce from Agile Tortoise (the developer of the fantastic Drafts app for iOS) shows us how to mimic Drafts’ "Append to Dropbox" using Alfred on a Mac.

the example I’m providing here mimics the default “Append to Dropbox” action in Drafts. In it’s current setup, you trigger Alfred with it’s hot key, type “j”, space, then the text you want appended to the file and hit return. The text is then added to the a file at “~/Dropbox/Apps/Drafts/Journal.txt” along with a timestamp

This looks cool and I’ll try it out as soon as I get back to a Mac…

From: Agile Tortoise Blog

Drafts for iPhone and iPad

Drafts for iPhone and iPad

Drafts for iPhoneIts not often that an iOS app makes its way to take up precious position on my device’s dock. Actually, its not often an app goes onto my main screen, let alone the dock, so when this does occur its really saying something about the potential of that app.
David Sparks of the Mac Power Users podcast has mentioned once or twice about an iPhone app called Drafts, which is a quick way to collect thoughts and info as they arise. David, along with his co-host Katie Floyd, have become people who I pay attention to when it comes to productivity on Mac and iOS devices, and when David recently blogged about the release of a new version of Drafts for the iPhone along with a new version for the iPad, it was time to give the app a try.

Of course, the fact that Brett Terpstra and the Time Management Ninja blog also posted about the release of Drafts 2 / Drafts for the iPad only reinforced the need for me to check it out.

This “quick collect” system fits nicely with David Allen’s Getting Things Done (GTD) as it allows an iPhone user to quickly collect ideas and thoughts as they arise, so that they can be processed and organised later for action.

On opening Drafts, the first thing seen is a blank note. You can quickly type your thought and leave the app, no other action required. By default, if you reopen the open more than 60 seconds later, it will automotically start a new note, but of course you can review older captured thoughts. If you’re running Drafts on both iPhone and iPad, there is a seamless syncing capability of the notes.

Once you’ve got your drafts, its quite simple to later do something with them. You can Tweet, post to Facebook, send emails or messages, send to apps like Byword or DayOne, or other web services like Evernote and Dropbox.

As a writer, I like that Drafts supports John Gruber’s Markdown. This allows me to easily integrate Drafts to my writing workflow, which is built around Byword as my editing device. From Byword, its easy for me to then export to my Squarespace or WordPress blogs, or to apps like Pages, Scrivener or iBooks Author. My only criticism of Drafts is that the Markdown preview process seems a little flakey at this time. I am sure that will be fixed shortly.

I like the seamless, low-threshhold method of quickly capturing thoughts and ideas. The app has a lot of power, and easily integrate into many workflows. As with any capture device (such an in-trays and inboxes), the trick is to ensure that it’s contents are regularly processed and organised for action. Get Drafts for iPhone and iPad