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Thoughts on Evolving to an iPad Only Future

Thoughts on Evolving to an iPad Only Future

I’ve discussed previously about how more and more people are going iPad only, or at least iPad Primary. People like Federico Viticci have famously gone iPad only, and educator Fraser Spiers wonders if a MacBook Pro can substitute for an iPad Pro.

More and more people are sharing their adventures and epiphanies in going iPad Only, or iPad Primary, and I thought I might share some links to some of those stories…

Drew Coffman discusses his thoughts on Living With the iPad Pro. Clearly Drew has found that the iPad Pro is the ideal computing device for his current needs:

The thing that excites me more than anything is that the iPad Pro is such a young platform. Even with its flaws, I’m still enjoying it more than any other computer I’ve ever used. There’s plenty of room for the iPad (and iOS in general) to grow—but I’m no longer using today’s technology while dreaming of tomorrow’s. I’m more than happy with what exists in the present.

Meanwhile, Khoi Vinh comes to the conclusion that he isDone with MacBooks, though not with Macs:

But now, in contrast to my iPad, my laptop seems altogether much more cumbersome than I prefer to deal with. It’s much, much heavier and bulkier than my iPad, especially when you factor in its power supply and a carrying case.

He is speaking as a designer who relies on the powerful features available in macOS, yet his conclusion is that the best place for the high-end desktop OS is on his desktop, where he can have a high-end computer…

When I think about where I’m most productive with OS X, it’s always at my desk, where I have a huge monitor.

This makes a lot of sense. No matter how good a notebook computer is, a desktop running the same OS is always going to be more powerful and more flexible.

Ben Brooks is another who has a clear view on Why iOS is Compelling

iOS is my everything place now. It’s not only always with me, but it’s always in sync with itself. What’s on my iPad is on my iPhone

Justin Blanton made a prediction on Twitter in 2011 that looks like it might be closer to the truth than fantasy…

In a recent post Justin provides an update on the evolution to iPhone-only

nearly all of my professional (and personal) consumption can be done enjoyably from my iPhone or iPad; and almost all of my professional output is channeled through either email or Messenger, also easily handled by my iOS devices.

Clearly he broadened his thinking to include tablet devices, but he is actually upping the game on his prediction – he now thinks that iPhone 8 will be the tipping point. I like that he talks about the ‘enjoyability’ factor of using an iPhone or iPad.

###Conclusion

Some of these above are going iPad Only, others are going iPad Primary (especially when mobile), and others are even moving to iPhone centric. The future of on-the-go computing is clearly going to be centred on nimble, portable devices like tablets and smartphones.

Notebook and laptop computers are far from dead, but the real place where a desktop OS like OSX or Windows delivers the greatest power will be on the desktop.

Thoughts on the Apple iPhone Events for September 2013

Thoughts on the Apple iPhone Events for September 2013

Just before going to bed last night, I checked my RSS feeds to see posts about Apple hosting a second announcement event next week, this time in China:

The invite is the same as the one for the main U.S. event, which leads us to believe whatever is announced in Cupertino the day before will be headed China’s way.

When I awoke this morning, the interest in the Chinese event had continued:

Apple has sent out custom invitations to Chinese media outlets for an event being held in China on September 11th, one full day after Apple’s normal press event on the 10th

Some may notice that these two posts were separted by sleep. Overnight. Yet both posts were issued during the same business day. But that was in America, and I am in Australia, and Australia is in a different timezone.

I make this comment, because the China event is not “one full day after Apple’s normal press event…”. It (the Chinese, presumably abnormal event) is, in fact, only about 9 hours after the Cupertino one. So the question of what will be announced, and which executive(s) will front each event is in itself interesting. I don’t think it will be just teleconference – Apple will have an individual executive at each location.

Subsequently, additional information has come to light about satellite Apple press events to be held in Tokyo and Berlin, as well as Cupertino and Beijing. Clearly things are getting interesting – Apple has not held satellite events in recent years.

So it’s time to look into the crystal ball and think about what might be announced.

Cupertino Core Event

iPhone

Last January I posted my thoughts on the rumoured low-cost iPhone. In that post I gave a 75% probability on the likelihood of such a low cost phone, with two major reasons:

  1. Migration of all on-sale iPhone devices to the Lightning connector.
  2. Migration of all on-sale iPhones to the iPhone 5 screen dimensions.

I predicted that we would end up with three iPhone models in late 2013:

  • The iPhone 5S (in 32GB, 64GB and 128GB[1] models)
  • The iPhone 5 (in 16GB) as a mid-range model[2]
  • The low-cost iPhone (probably in 16GB)

My thoughts are that this roadmap remains the likely outcome from next week’s event(s). We now have a probable name for for the “low-cost” iPhone – the iPhone 5C.

iPhone 5C

C probably stands for “colour” and possibly “China”. But not cheap. It might be low-cost, and will certainly be “cheaper”, but as Rene Ritchie says, there’s likely to be nothing cheap about the lower-cost iPhone:

Apple may not know how to (i.e. be willing to) make cheap products, but over the last decade they’ve proven they can continuously introduce lower cost ones when and as they choose.

The iPhone 5C will have all the key hardware features of the current iPhone 5, but will have a plastic case that has various colour options. I agree with John Gruber’s thoughts that the iPhone 5C will also have all the software features announced for the iPhone 5S:

Apple can withhold cutting edge software features from old devices; they can’t do that for brand-new ones.

I don’t expect any other hardware innovations (aside from the lower cost casing) over the iPhone 5S.

iPhone 5S

We will possibly see a champagne coloured iPhone 5S, in addition to black and white versions.

There will quite possibly be a fingerprint sensor on the 5S, and if this launches as rumoured, I think it will herald a potential major shift in security and usability of smartphones, and presumably later tablets when the next generation of iPad is launched.

I am almost certain we will see a bump in memory, with 32GB, 64GB and 128GB models on offer.

In terms of wireless communications, near field communications (NFC) remains a possibility[3], as does improved WiFi with support for 802.11ac and improved Bluetooth support.

Battery life will likely further improve.

Apple TV

Something is happening in this area, with rumours of multiple deliveries of “set top box with communications feature” from China. I have no idea if this a new version of Apple TV if we know it, a new device or simply rumours leaked to keep Gene Munster and other pundits occupied.

An Apple TV that supports an AppStore and apps will come. I’m just not sure when.

iPad, iPod and Macs

Not at this event. It will be focused on iPhone and iOS7.

iOS7

It’s no secret that iOS 7 is to be released along with the new iPhone, and given the normal iOS beta release history, we may expect to see a Gold Master release immediately following the announcement, and the release to users a week or so later, prior to the release of the new iPhone models.

iOS 7 beta 6 was released on 15 August 2013. I would have thought that we were due for a new release by now, so maybe the current release is stable enough to be ready to go gold. At least for iPhone.

Some rumours suggest that the release of iOS 7 for iPad may be delayed as it may not be as stable on that platform, and so that developers can focus their efforts on a great release for iPhone.

iOS 7 sports many great new features, as well as a flatter design and new app icons[4]. iOS 7 is the biggest change in iOS since the release of the first iPhone, and I am sure that there will be a learning curve as well as strong reactions from many users – both positive and critical.

I am of the opinion that from time-to-time a fundamental, in-your-face change to the look and feel of a system is important to combat the perception of stagnation. The trick is to migrate that change whilst maintaining the core of the user experience and all the good stuff.

I am looking forward to seeing if there are any Siri-esque surprise features to come in iOS 7. I suspect there might be.

Satellite Events

I think that each satellite event will have a senior Apple executive (not a country manger) hosting it. Tim Cook will chair run the show in Cupertino, and do a satellite intro elsewhere. Eddy Cue, Craig Federighi, Phil Schiller and Jeff Williams are likely to play a role at the core event, or host at the remote location.

Each event will recap the products and offerings launched at the Cupertino Core Event, and then will provide something unique to that country/region.

One more thing – simultanous release of the iPhone to even more markets is highly likely.

Beijing

More emphasis here will be placed on the launch of the iPhone 5C, but there will likely be an announcement of a partnership with China Mobile.

Tokyo

Wondering out loud, but given that NTT DoCoMo has lost 3.2 million customers due to the launch of iPhone, perhaps it is time for NTT DoCOMo to relax it’s walled garden approach to a user experience.

Berlin

I have no idea what will happen here. It could be just a play to have live events in each major timezone, especially given that the IFA conference is in town, and there will be a lot of tech media in town already. And Apple may want to steal some media thunder from, say, Samsung[5].

Conclusion

A new iPhone 5S and a lower-cost iPhone 5C, supported by a legacy iPhone 5 in 32GB are likely to be launched, with simultaneous availability in major global markets.

iOS 7 will release quickly, at least for iPhone. I think we’ll see a surprise or two.


  1. My predictions about the memory bumps was wishful thinking, but I think them more than likely…  ↩

  2. I suspect now that the iPhone 5, mid-range model, will probably now be a 32GB model. But that’s just a guess.  ↩

  3. I wish I could call it a probability rather than a possibility.  ↩

  4. Some of which are more popular than others.  ↩

  5. Samsung will launch the Galaxy Note 3 at the IFA event, and have just announced the Samsung Galaxy Gear smart watch immediately before the start  ↩

Keeping Your Phone on Silent

Keeping Your Phone on Silent

Have you ever been waiting in a queue for service for some time, only to have to wait a bit longer because the assistant stops to take a phone call? When I’ve experienced this I’ve often been frustrated, and I think this is because I wonder why the person on the phone gets priority over those waiting in person.

Following a link from John Gruber I saw this article at Vanity Fair about the iPhone of Dave Morin, the founder of Path.

When asked about his ring tone, Morin replied:

I don’t use a ring of any kind on my phone. This is so that I am always on offense and never defense

I gather that Gruber was not impressed with Morin’s opinion. Personally I thought that the statement about always being on offense was a bit dicky. It kind of felt like he tries to always be offensive….

With that said, I keep my iPhone in the silent mode 95%+ of the time.

One of the key things in personal productivity is managing interuptions. In many respects, we live in an attention deficit society. Mobile phones ring, email alerts pop and alerts twirp incessantly. And we all tend to allow ourselves to be interupted.

When I present, conduct training, chair a meeting or act as an MC, I ask people to put their phones in silent mode or turn them off altogether. Sometimes I joke that I offer a half day training course in how to do this. Or a week long residenetial off-site course for managers and executives…

The “interuptitis” epidemic is a key barrier to real productivity in the 21st century. One popular suggestion is, as described by Leo Babuata of Zen Habits, to

Turn off all notifications. Trying to focus while something is notifying you of an incoming email or tweet or Facebook update is impossible.

I think this applies just as much to the phone as it does to other notifications.

When I advocate this, people ask what happens if I miss a call. There are three options:

  1. If the caller leaves a message (with a clear, relevant purpose that has value to me), I’ll call back;
  2. If they don’t leave a message, then they will probably call back; or,
  3. If they don’t leave a message and they don’t call back, it probably wasn’t important.

Although my phone is on silent I do leave the vibrate function on. As my phone sits near me on my desk, I hear it vibrate if I am close enough. If I don’t hear it, or if I am focused on something else, then the above three options kick in.

When I am on-the-go, my phone is generally in my pocket. I’ll feel the vibrations, and will take the call if I am in a position to do so. When I am presenting or conducting training the phone is usually in Airplane mode to avoid interuptions altogether.

Now I occasionally I do switch the silent mode off. That’s generally reserved for when I am expecting an important call. If I am with other people, I explain this up front, if possible, and I will leave the room or the immediate area if the call comes in. For the sake of the other people, and the important call coming in, I will quickly silence any calls from other parties.

Phones, email, text messaging, RSS feeds and social media are all tools that can be important parts of our productivity setup. And they can all very easily become time sinks, or what I call productivity sink holes. Use notifications, ring tones and alerts wisely, and never be afraid to turn them off.

Day One for iOS gets a huge update with PDF export and more

Day One for iOS gets a huge update with PDF export and more

Day One appOne of my absolute most used apps is the journalling app Day One, available for iOS and OSX. The iOS version this week received a major update, going to version 1.10, where the ability to export entries (single or a range) to a PDF file was introduced.

This is a terrific enhancement that allows the user to extract key data, perhaps sorted by tag (introduced last year to the iOS version) to a standalone PDF document, or perhaps to a PDF document that might then be stored in a system such as Evernote or DEVONthink.

Other updates include:

  • Custom date range- Tag filtering
  • Send PDF to iBooks, Dropbox and other apps
  • Export will run in background
  • Quick single entry export via Send menu
  • Historical weather increased from 3 days to 30 days
  • New reminder sound
  • Added Sanchez font option
  • Improved header and HTML styling

I love the direct Day One is taking, and look forward to these updates (and previous ones like tagging and geo-location) being introduced to the OSX version, soon (please)!

iOS 6.1 Update for iPhone, iPad and Apple TV

iOS 6.1 Update for iPhone, iPad and Apple TV

iOS 6.1 Update Screenshot from Apple.comNo doubt all serious iPad and iPhone users are busy downloading the iOS 6.1 Software Update, which has a couple of new features, though nothing outstanding unless you’re in the US, or one of the additional 23 markets covered by LTE:

  • LTE support for more carriers
  • Purchase movie tickets through Fandango with Siri (USA only)
  • iTunes Match subscribers can now download individual songs from iCloud
  • New button to reset the Advertising Identifier

I must admit that I am just as excited by the announcement that they have updated Apple TV with Up Next and Bluetooth Keyboard. Update features include:

  • iTunes in the Cloud
  • Bluetooth keyboard: Use your Apple Wireless Keyboard to control your Apple TV.
  • AirPlay audio for videos: Send stereo audio from movies, TV shows, and other videos on Apple TV to AirPlay-enabled speakers and devices
  • Stability and performance

All of these update items are terrific, but the addition of bluetooth has been a long time coming, and will be quite welcome when searching for particular items. I have also found the Apple TV to be a bit temperamental at times, so am looking forward to the stability and performance updates.

Google Maps for iOS Review: Good but sent me to the wrong place…

Google Maps for iOS Review: Good but sent me to the wrong place…

As I stated when iOS 6 was first released, map data has to work properly because of its intrinsic relationship with, well, all aspects of life.
A lot of people bemoaned Apple having dropped Google maps, because Google has been developed over many years, whereas Apple’s maps were a version 1 product. Google has also been much praised about the accuracy of its mapping data, as a result of, among other things, the fact the Google sends people out to check the mapping data.

I expect Apple will continue to improve their mapping data, and find the UI of their app to be good. But like most, we need the data to be accurate. Even Victoria Police in Australia has made specific warnings about trusting Apple Maps in navigating to the town of Mildura due to inaccurate map data.

When Google Maps was released for iOS, I was keen to try out the app to see if the app would give me the best of both worlds in terms of accurate data and a simple UI.

So I downloaded the app, and yesterday tried it out to navigate from Parramatta in Sydney’s west to a major shopping centre called Castle Towers. Castle Towers is a major centre that has been open since 1982, and is even home to one of the 7 Apple Stores in Sydney.

Google Maps’ UI was great, and it took me seconds to work out how to plan a route, and start the turn-by-turn navigation function. I really like the turn-by-turn experience, with clear information on the next turn, and (where appropriate) information about immediately following turns. In short, I like it, and can see this app replacing TomTom as my major navigation tool.

The app got me close to the shopping centre, but not to it. In fact, it told me I had arrived when I was in a leafy surburban street about 2 blocks from the centre. Not knowing the centre, I didn’t realise it was two blocks behind me, so I drove further down the street. A check of Google Street View in the Google Maps app showed me that there was no shopping centre there! (see photo)

So while nowhere as serious as the Mildura incident, the hallowed Google Maps failed me on its first usage, and it failed to find a major complex that is far from a recent addition.

After leaving Castle Towers, I set a course to visit Tamworth in regional NSW, a major town about 5–6 hours from Sydney. The app worked brilliantly, and tracked time and distance extremely well. In fact, it seems to estimate time a bit better than Apple Maps.

Plotting a trip home from Tamworth, Google Maps tells me it will be 5 hours 42 minutes, whilst Apple Maps predicts 5 hours 14 minutes. I bet that even in perfect traffic, 5:42 will be a best case scenario.

Google Maps will probably be my go-to app for turn-by-turn navigation, based on user experience, turn-by-turn functionality and overall better map data. I like the app, but will keep using the Apple Maps app as well to see how it improves.