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Bringing Life to Still Images on iPad Pro with Plotagraph+

Bringing Life to Still Images on iPad Pro with Plotagraph+

My passion is still photography – capturing wonderful landscapes, seascape, underwater and travel scenes is what inspires my photography. I have put together some short videos (mostly timelapse), but the truth of it is that still images grab me, and the challenge of creating an image that tells a story in the sort time a shutter is open is motivating.

Movement, however, catches the eye, and although a good still image can imply movement there are a number of emerging methods of bringing life to still images.

Since the middle of last year I have been Playing around with Plotagraph Pro as a way of bringing some animation to still images. I like the results, and Plotagraph Pro in that time has come out of beta, introduced new pricing tiers (including a free one) and started to rollout social sharing features.

The Plotagraphs website features some very impressive examples of Plotagraphs (Plotagraphy??) by some very talented image makers.

Recently the Plotagraph team, with the support of image makers like Trey Ratcliff, has released an iOS app called Plotagraph + which brings the functionality to mobile devices[1]. Alongside Affinity Photo for iPad this app is truly positioning the iPad Pro at the core of my on-the-go photo workflow.

I created this Plotagraph in a few short minutes on the iPad on Sunday afternoon.

Red Sky Blue Pools from Des Paroz on Vimeo.

The image below shows the edits I made to the original image

Plotagraph+ edits in progress on iPad
Plotagraph+ edits in progress on iPad

Essentially the green-dots-leading-to-red-dashed-lines-to-blue-arrowheads are what I set for the direction and speed of movement, and the red dots near the horizon are anchor points that prevent movement beyond them.

Plotagraph+ Pros

  • Easy (very easy) to use.
  • Easy output to video and animated PNG formats.
  • Price effective.

Plotagraph+ Cons

  • No output to animated GIF for simple sharing[2].
  • App crashes if you try to load a RAW file[3].
  • Only sharing option is through Photos. I'd love to be able to share to Dropbox or other galleries (such as Plotagraphs.com) more directly.

Final Thoughts

I love this app, and the promise it provides for a fun and easy way to give life to images. Like HDR[4] Plotagraphs will likely allow image makers to express their worldview in their own art, and of course beauty will be in the eye of the beholder. A lot of Plotagraphs will be good, some will be great and some will have faces that only the owner could love.

For me, a relatively small portion of my images will be Plotagraphs, but I will have fun creating and sharing some when it suits the image and the story I am trying to tell with it.

For more info on Plotagraph+ take a look at this video by Trey Ratcliff

The Jetty

The Jetty

A photo in Smithsonian Science

Wrasse in the BlueChuffed that one of my photos, Wrasse in the Blue, has been published in Smithsonian Science.

All my images are published with a Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial license, and I love it that one of them has been chosen in such an incredible source of science based learning.

The Jetty

It is always amazing to discover the photographic opportunities that lay waiting in your home area.

Living in the Sutherland Shire, I often drive straight down the Princes Highway when getting up early for sunrise photos, yet one beautiful opportunity is a private jetty in nearby Sylvania Waters.

The jetty is under a private lease and is private property, but the beach is public access, so I tend to wander down to the beach and shoot from the the sand immediately adjacent to the jetty.

This image has been created with a touch of blur added in MacPhun’s excellent ‘Focus Pro’ app, which I use as an add in in Aperture (still).

View this image on 500px, Ello or Flickr

Feeding Time

Feeding Time

Time to post an underwater image!

To be honest, I am not sure how exactly I feel about shark feeds.

In general, shark feeding can change shark behaviour—making them reliant on being fed at a certain time and certain place, and perhaps on food stuff they wouldn’t normally consume.

In the Marovo Lagoon region of the Solomon Islands the shark stocks were almost wiped out by overfishing, namely by fishing boats from Greater China who paid local communities for the rights to fish out the shark stocks.

Uepi Island Resort has worked with a variety of conservation groups and the local communities to build awareness of the value of sharks to marine diversity, and the value in terms of tourism dollars.

As part of this, Uepi conducts feeds under the pier whereby photographer guests can get in and shoot as I did, whilst eliminating waste food product. The feeds are conducted irregularly, at different times of the day.

There has been a noted rebuilding of shark life around Marovo Lagoon.

So a shark feed for the sake of an adrenalin rush alone I am against. But when it is being done as part of a concerted effort for conservation purposes I can support.

I did enjoy the adrenaline rush, but I also have to say that I was honoured to have the chance to document the experience.

Photographically this was a tough gig—the water was already a little cloudy on the day. Throw in the food stuff and a bunch of sharks to stir things up, and it made for quite a challenge.

I was under the pier snorkelling, with the pier itself affording some protection from curious sharks (they were never aggressive).

Meanwhile Belinda was on the pier above me with another camera. As they were both time synced, it was interesting to see the sequence of shots—in some cases Belinda and I made shots of the same ‘action’ from above and below.

View Feeding Time on 500px

View Feeding Time on Flickr